- Communications -

 Parents, Students, Faculty & Staff and the Merrillville community at large, please let us welcome you to the communications web page brought to you by the staff of the Information Technology Services Department. We hope you find the various links on this web page informative and helpful. We invite you to contact us should you have any questions or comments.


Mankindís single greatest achievements over all other creatures is our ability to communicate complex ideas and thoughts using a variety of effective communications techniques. Indeed one could argue that every achievement ever made by mankind owes its very existence to our ability to communicate effectively. 

Historically transactions made between two individuals used sight and sound, the two key ingredients in the communications formula, have been limited in distance and time. Participants in the communications process had to be in the same place at the same time to communicate. To achieve true greatness however, mankind had to overcome the limitations of space and time.

Though hard to move from place to place, the limitations of time were probably first overcome by the advent of the cave drawing.  This new form of communications permitted one generation to "speak" to the next. A way of moving information from one time to another time. Eventually stone tablets replaced cave walls, animal skins replaced stone tablets, parchments replaced animal skins, paper replaced parchments, eventually leading to books; the technology was ever so slowly evolving to overcome the basic limitations of space and time. 

Co-developing with the "technology of communications", was the nature of what we communicated. Mankind's earliest forms of communications were probably not much more then a grunt or pointing gestures, perhaps indicating a direction for others to look for food or danger. However, with time the nature of communications evolved. As mankind began to learn to communicate more effectively through sounds, drawing, and eventually by symbolic means such as writing,  the thoughts we communicated became more complex as well. Each step in technology was co-evolving with far more complex ideas and thoughts. This co-evolution of knowledge and technology or "content" has been going on since the dawn of time. 

The modern world is not only not exempt from the effects of this intertwined relationship between knowledge and media, but is indeed a product of it. As important as the printing of the first book by Gutenberg was, so are the achievements in sound and sight by such great individuals as Thomas Edison with his phonograph, Alexander Gram Bell's and his telephone, Nikola Tesla and  Guglielmo Marconi with radio, Alexander Bain with facsimile, and Zworykin and Farnsworth  with television. These great achievements  not only give us sight and sound over distance and time but are  tools to convey even more ideas more complex then ever before. 

At last we behold what has been dubbed "The Information Age", and it is truly upon us. To the masses comes email, multimedia presentations, distance learning, video teleconferencing, desktop publishing, "blogging" and much more. These new media technologies have brought with them a world of  information and knowledge, on demand, available not only when we want it,  but how we want it. Like their predecessors before them the very nature of these media are changing the content of what we communicate.  The evolution of the very nature of communications is still very much "in progress" and so to is the complex knowledge of what we convey.

With the next generation of humans and the technology they bring into the world, we have no doubt the ballet of the technology of communications and the knowledge it communicates, will continue....  

 

Jay Shoup
Network Administrator, Communications and Security Services
Merrillville Community School Corporation
276 East 68th Place
Merrillville, IN 46410

(219) 650-5376  Ext: 7676
Phonesupport@mvsc.k12.in.us

 

 

                           On the "Less" than serious side!

 
Telephone Company Theme Song
A Gold Letter Day in History The History of AT&T & The Telephone
Using Your Telephone
An Important Training Film
How We Deal With Long Distance Telephone Communications
The Modern Operator The Modern Telephone System